William Gurnall William Gurnall (1617 - 1679)
Justification
"We are justified, not by giving anything to God, --- what we do, --- but by receiving from God, what Christ hath done for us."
 
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Calvin's Commentaries Vol XX - I Corinthians, II Corinthians Go back to previous page
Calvin, John
Book title
Book Details
Hardcover: 912 pages
Subtitle: N/A
Publisher: Baker Books, a Division of Baker Publishing Group
Category: Bible Commentary
Edition: 500th Anniversary Edition Edition
Publish Date: 20090105
ISBN: 9780801013317
Dewey Decimal Classification: N/A
Reference No: C-00242
Synopsis
"A classic commentary on the Old and New Testaments, complete and unabridged. Written in a clear, lucid style, it combines a profound reverence for the Bible with a rare objectivity in its exegesis. John Calvin (Middle French: Jean Cauvin; 10 July 1509 -- 27 May 1564) was an influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism. Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530. After religious tensions provoked a violent uprising against Protestants in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where in 1536 he published the first edition of his seminal work Institutes of the Christian Religion. Calvin was a tireless polemic and apologetic writer who generated much controversy. He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger. In addition to the Institutes, he wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible as well as theological treatises and confessional documents, and he regularly gave sermons throughout the week in Geneva. Calvin was influenced by the Augustinian tradition, which led him to expound the doctrine of predestination and the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation. Calvin's writing and preachings provided the seeds for the branch of theology that bears his name. The Presbyterian and other Reformed churches, which look to Calvin as a chief expositor of their beliefs, have spread throughout the world. Calvin's thought exerted considerable influence over major religious figures and entire religious movements, such as Puritanism, and some political historians have argued that his ideas have contributed to the rise of capitalism, individualism, and representative democracy in the West. "